Sylvia Plath's composition " Two Campers in Cloud Country” displays tones of naturalization and of objection to culture. The loudspeaker expresses his distaste intended for the routine life great respect pertaining to nature with a few style with literary products. In Sylvia Plath's poem " Two Campers in Cloud Country” the presenter uses diction and radical language to portray attitudes of mockery towards world and shock towards the freedom of nature.

Initial, the loudspeaker opens the poem simply by saying " In this region there is none measure neither balance” (l. 1). It has a negative connotation and is the initial expression of how the loudspeaker uses diction to display bad feelings to society. Another negative significance is if the speaker cell phone calls the clouds " man-shaming” (l. 3). The presenter also refers to people while " trolls” (l. 6), insinuating that people are slaves to culture. These adverse connotations will be directed towards the mundane city life with it's " labeled elms” (l. 9) and it's " tame tea-roses” (l. 9). Another characterization of the speaker's mockery of society is a use of sound devices. This is very important when considering the diction as the plosive noises give the target audience a depths of the mind understanding of how a speaker seems. For example , the term " gesture” (l. 4) presents the naturalistic approach to how unimportant people are in comparison to the clouds. Because seen in series six, " trolls” also is used for a sound device coupled with unfavorable connotations. One more example of joining plosive sounds with negative connotations will be " General public Gardens” (l. 7). The plosive sound devices happen to be purposefully placed by the audio to create a more apparent unhappiness in his diction. More often than not the speaker makes blatant assertions towards the severe and confining life inside the city. By simply stating " one wearies of the Public Gardens” (l. 7) the speaker is usually deliberately directing to the civilization's tedious life-style. In line 18 the loudspeaker says " It is comfy, for a change, to mean therefore...