Soames is anything but a simple figure. He is,

for one thing, a symbol of the possessive principle

inspiring the upper-middle-class of Great britain. He is the

most Forsyteian in the Forsytes, a great honour he shares, maybe, with his daddy, James; dr. murphy is the embodiment of the need to

own which relation all things--land, bouses, paintings,

even women--in terms of ownership

QUERIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1 . Precisely what is John Galsworthy's manner of publishing? What differentiates him from the other writers of his era? 2 . Just how is Galsworthy's ironic attitude to the friends and family relationship of the Forsytes expressed? 3. What is the author's feeling to his heroes? Does this individual put it in words? four. Is the information of the place and the dinner detailed or perhaps brief? Are definitely the details of household furniture, dress relevant for the understanding of the Forsytes? Do a list of details illustrative in the elegance of their home. 5. What are Galsworthy's ways of disclosing the feelings of Soames? Mention the words displaying Soames's growing alarm. 6. Find out the sentences that contain the author's generalizations from the Forsyte personality. 7. How far can we judge Soames by attitude he adopts toward his better half? Also simply by her attitude to him. 8. Choose the epithets that characterize Irene's discontentment with her married life. 9. Prove that Soames's feeling for his wife is a man of property. Show the means that inform you that Soames looked upon Irene's beauty as one of his finest possessions. Give examples and quotations in the text. 10. Why does Galsworthy repeatedly tension the stop of the husband and wife? 11. Examine the brief dialogue between husband and wife: which will of their features stand out clearest in their discussion? 12. Characterize Soames's method of speaking.

13. Speak of the elements of parody in Galsworthy's description of recent plays.